3 Tips For Banana Success
1. Place overripe bananas in a zipper-lock plastic bag and freeze them. When you’re ready to make banana bread, thaw the bananas on the counter until softened.
2. Know your banana. There are hundreds of varieties - baby bananas are floral sweet, Orinoco bananas have lemon undertones, and red bananas offer apple and raspberry aftertastes.
3. Kick up your banana bread with caramelized bananas: roast bananas for 20 minutes until black-skinned, cool, and peel and mash as the recipe directs. The bananas will be sweeter and more intensely flavorful.
Ready to go bananas? Our Banana Split Cake is cool and creamy.

3 Tips For Banana Success

1. Place overripe bananas in a zipper-lock plastic bag and freeze them. When you’re ready to make banana bread, thaw the bananas on the counter until softened.

2. Know your banana. There are hundreds of varieties - baby bananas are floral sweet, Orinoco bananas have lemon undertones, and red bananas offer apple and raspberry aftertastes.

3. Kick up your banana bread with caramelized bananas: roast bananas for 20 minutes until black-skinned, cool, and peel and mash as the recipe directs. The bananas will be sweeter and more intensely flavorful.

Ready to go bananas? Our Banana Split Cake is cool and creamy.

3 Tips For Avocado Success
1. Use a pastry blender instead of a fork to mash avocados more quickly.
2. Check an avocado for ripeness by flicking its small stem. If it comes off easily and you can see green underneath, the avocado is ripe. If the stem does not come off or if you see brown underneath it, the avocado is not ripe.
3. To cleanly remove pits, slice around the avocado with a chef’s knife. Twist the two halves apart. Stick the blade sharply into the pit. Lift the knife, twisting the blade if necessary to loosen the pit. Use a large wooden spoon to safely pry the pit off the knife.
Now try our Pineapple-Avocado Salsa, amazing with fish, chicken, or by the spoonful.

3 Tips For Avocado Success

1. Use a pastry blender instead of a fork to mash avocados more quickly.

2. Check an avocado for ripeness by flicking its small stem. If it comes off easily and you can see green underneath, the avocado is ripe. If the stem does not come off or if you see brown underneath it, the avocado is not ripe.

3. To cleanly remove pits, slice around the avocado with a chef’s knife. Twist the two halves apart. Stick the blade sharply into the pit. Lift the knife, twisting the blade if necessary to loosen the pit. Use a large wooden spoon to safely pry the pit off the knife.

Now try our Pineapple-Avocado Salsa, amazing with fish, chicken, or by the spoonful.

STALE COOKIES NO MORE
Sure, you can try to eat an entire tin of soft, chewy cookies before they grow stale and harden—or you can store them along with tortillas and parchment paper. The tortillas fit tidily into the tin, where their moisture keeps cookies soft for days. Start by tracing the bottom of a cookie tin on a sheet of parchment paper, then cut it out and repeat as needed. Layer the parchment, a tortilla, parchment, and layer of completely cooled cookies in the tin. Repeat until the tin is full, ending with a layer of cookies. Get more tips here. 

STALE COOKIES NO MORE

Sure, you can try to eat an entire tin of soft, chewy cookies before they grow stale and harden—or you can store them along with tortillas and parchment paper. The tortillas fit tidily into the tin, where their moisture keeps cookies soft for days. Start by tracing the bottom of a cookie tin on a sheet of parchment paper, then cut it out and repeat as needed. Layer the parchment, a tortilla, parchment, and layer of completely cooled cookies in the tin. Repeat until the tin is full, ending with a layer of cookies. Get more tips here. 

It can be difficult to use up a pound of bacon before it becomes rancid. Freezing is the best way to preserve it, but if frozen in the original package, it’s impossible to later remove just a few slices at a time. To solve the dilemma, roll up the bacon in tight cylinders, each with two to four slices of bacon. Place the cylinders in a zipper-lock bag and place the bag flat in the freezer. (Once the slices are frozen, the bag can be stored as you like.) When bacon is needed, simply pull out the desired number of slices and defrost.
For more tips on bacon, click here.

It can be difficult to use up a pound of bacon before it becomes rancid. Freezing is the best way to preserve it, but if frozen in the original package, it’s impossible to later remove just a few slices at a time. To solve the dilemma, roll up the bacon in tight cylinders, each with two to four slices of bacon. Place the cylinders in a zipper-lock bag and place the bag flat in the freezer. (Once the slices are frozen, the bag can be stored as you like.) When bacon is needed, simply pull out the desired number of slices and defrost.

For more tips on bacon, click here.