Make Homemade Corn Dogs for the Best Baseball-Watching Season Ever
A Snack-on-a-Stick Recipe From Cook’s Country
Why This Recipe Works: To re-create this crowd favorite at home, we made a light batter with flour, cornmeal, buttermilk, and eggs. Coating the skewered hot dogs in flour before batter-dipping ensures the batter adheres to the hot dogs. To make coating the hot dogs easy, we transfer the batter to a tall drinking glass for even, hassle free dunking.
MAKES 8 CORN DOGS
Ingredients are linked to our official taste tests and favorite products.
1 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 3/4 cups buttermilk 4 large eggs, lightly beaten 8 hot dogs 3 quarts peanut or vegetable oil
1. Set wire rack inside rimmed baking sheet. Whisk cornmeal, 1 cup flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, salt, and cayenne together in bowl. Whisk in buttermilk and eggs until incorporated. Place remaining 1/2 cup flour in shallow dish. Dredge hot dogs in flour and shake to remove excess. Thread hot dogs lengthwise onto eight 8-inch skewers.
2. Add oil to large Dutch oven until it measures about 2 inches deep and heat over medium-high heat to 350 degrees. Stir batter to recombine, then transfer half of batter to tall drinking glass. Working with one at a time, submerge hot dog in glass and twirl to coat with batter. Allow excess batter to drip back into glass and place corn dog in hot oil. Repeat immediately with 3 more hot dogs. Fry corn dogs, turning occasionally, until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer to wire rack. Return oil to 350 degrees and repeat with remaining batter and hot dogs. Serve.
Related: 5 Buttermilk Questions You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask

Make Homemade Corn Dogs for the Best Baseball-Watching Season Ever

A Snack-on-a-Stick Recipe From Cook’s Country

Why This Recipe Works: To re-create this crowd favorite at home, we made a light batter with flour, cornmeal, buttermilk, and eggs. Coating the skewered hot dogs in flour before batter-dipping ensures the batter adheres to the hot dogs. To make coating the hot dogs easy, we transfer the batter to a tall drinking glass for even, hassle free dunking.

MAKES 8 CORN DOGS

Ingredients are linked to our official taste tests and favorite products.

1 1/2 cups yellow cornmeal
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 3/4 cups buttermilk
4 large eggs, lightly beaten
hot dogs
3 quarts peanut or vegetable oil

1. Set wire rack inside rimmed baking sheet. Whisk cornmeal, 1 cup flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, salt, and cayenne together in bowl. Whisk in buttermilk and eggs until incorporated. Place remaining 1/2 cup flour in shallow dish. Dredge hot dogs in flour and shake to remove excess. Thread hot dogs lengthwise onto eight 8-inch skewers.

2. Add oil to large Dutch oven until it measures about 2 inches deep and heat over medium-high heat to 350 degrees. Stir batter to recombine, then transfer half of batter to tall drinking glass. Working with one at a time, submerge hot dog in glass and twirl to coat with batter. Allow excess batter to drip back into glass and place corn dog in hot oil. Repeat immediately with 3 more hot dogs. Fry corn dogs, turning occasionally, until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer to wire rack. Return oil to 350 degrees and repeat with remaining batter and hot dogs. Serve.

Related: 5 Buttermilk Questions You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask

HOW TO CUT A WHOLE CHICKEN INTO PARTS

Cutting up a whole chicken is a handy technique to learn, especially if you’re making no-holds-barred recipes like hearty chicken noodle soup from scratch or homemade fried chicken. Here are the basic steps—there are more visual details if you follow along with our how-to video.

  1. With cleaver or chef’s knife, cut through skin around leg where it attaches to breast.
  2. Using both hands, pop leg joint out of its socket.
  3. Cut through flesh, skin, and cartilage to detach leg from body.
  4. Bend wing out from breast and use boning knife to cut through joint. Repeat with other wing.
  5. Using kitchen shears, cut along either side of backbone to remove it from chicken.
  6. Using chef’s knife, firmly cut down center of breastbone to split breast in half.

Tying a Roast

In order to ensure that a roast maintains its shape during cooking, it’s important to secure it with butcher’s twine. These are our two favorite knots to use:

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1. Double Knot: Cut lengths of twine and space them at one-inch intervals under the meat. Then simply pull them over and tie a double knot. The only problem is that if you tie it too tightly or too loose, you have to cut it off and start over again.

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2. Butcher’s Knot: Start by pulling both ends of the string toward you, then pass the loop of the upper string under the lower string and give the loop a half turn towards you. Pass the end of the upper string over the lower string and through the loop. Then pull both sides of the upper string to tighten. Finally, pull the lower string up and down until the knot is secure against the meat. The knot can now easily be adjusted.

Either option will ensure that our recipe for Classic Roast Beef Tenderloin comes out of the oven looking perfect.