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DIY Kettle Chips
Whether thick cut, crinkle, plain, or flavored, potato chips are one of America’s most beloved snack foods. Our favorite is the small-batch, kettle-style chip. These chips have good potato flavor and a crisp, light texture. Though seemingly simple, perfecting a homemade version proved to be a challenge. Frying at too low a temperature made them soggy and greasy, but if we increased the heat, they burned. Targeting the potatoes’ starch as the source of our troubles, we finally landed on a method of rinsing, parboiling, then frying. It was a bit of work, but the reward of fresh, golden homemade potato chips was well worth it. —America’s Test Kitchen
Find this recipe and 100+ more like it in our DIY Cookbook
Makes about 6 cups
Make today, enjoy immediately
1 pound medium Yukon Gold potatoes, sliced 1/16 inch thick on mandoline 2 quarts vegetable oil Fine sea salt
1. Line rimmed baking sheet with clean dish towel. Set wire rack in second rimmed baking sheet and line with triple layer of paper towels; set both sheets aside. Place potato slices in large bowl and cover with cold water. Gently swirl potatoes to release starch. Drain potatoes and return to bowl. Repeat rinsing step until water no longer turns cloudy, about 5 rinses.
2. Bring 2 quarts water to boil in large saucepan over high heat. Add potatoes, return to gentle boil, and cook until just beginning to soften, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain potatoes well, then spread out over dish towel–lined sheet and thoroughly pat dry.
3. Meanwhile, heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat to 325 degrees. Carefully place one-quarter of potato slices in oil. Fry, stirring frequently with wire skimmer or slotted spoon, until oil stops bubbling and chips turn golden and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Adjust burner, if necessary, to maintain oil temperature around 325 degrees. As soon as chips finish frying (some chips may cook slightly faster than others), transfer to prepared wire rack using wire skimmer or slotted spoon. Season with salt to taste.
4. Return oil to 325 degrees and repeat with remaining potato slices in 3 more batches. Let cool completely before serving. (Kettle chips are best enjoyed the day they are made.)
DIY Kettle Chips
Whether thick cut, crinkle, plain, or flavored, potato chips are one of America’s most beloved snack foods. Our favorite is the small-batch, kettle-style chip. These chips have good potato flavor and a crisp, light texture. Though seemingly simple, perfecting a homemade version proved to be a challenge. Frying at too low a temperature made them soggy and greasy, but if we increased the heat, they burned. Targeting the potatoes’ starch as the source of our troubles, we finally landed on a method of rinsing, parboiling, then frying. It was a bit of work, but the reward of fresh, golden homemade potato chips was well worth it. —America’s Test Kitchen
Find this recipe and 100+ more like it in our DIY Cookbook
Makes about 6 cups
Make today, enjoy immediately
1 pound medium Yukon Gold potatoes, sliced 1/16 inch thick on mandoline 2 quarts vegetable oil Fine sea salt
1. Line rimmed baking sheet with clean dish towel. Set wire rack in second rimmed baking sheet and line with triple layer of paper towels; set both sheets aside. Place potato slices in large bowl and cover with cold water. Gently swirl potatoes to release starch. Drain potatoes and return to bowl. Repeat rinsing step until water no longer turns cloudy, about 5 rinses.
2. Bring 2 quarts water to boil in large saucepan over high heat. Add potatoes, return to gentle boil, and cook until just beginning to soften, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain potatoes well, then spread out over dish towel–lined sheet and thoroughly pat dry.
3. Meanwhile, heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat to 325 degrees. Carefully place one-quarter of potato slices in oil. Fry, stirring frequently with wire skimmer or slotted spoon, until oil stops bubbling and chips turn golden and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Adjust burner, if necessary, to maintain oil temperature around 325 degrees. As soon as chips finish frying (some chips may cook slightly faster than others), transfer to prepared wire rack using wire skimmer or slotted spoon. Season with salt to taste.
4. Return oil to 325 degrees and repeat with remaining potato slices in 3 more batches. Let cool completely before serving. (Kettle chips are best enjoyed the day they are made.)

DIY Kettle Chips

Whether thick cut, crinkle, plain, or flavored, potato chips are one of America’s most beloved snack foods. Our favorite is the small-batch, kettle-style chip. These chips have good potato flavor and a crisp, light texture. Though seemingly simple, perfecting a homemade version proved to be a challenge. Frying at too low a temperature made them soggy and greasy, but if we increased the heat, they burned. Targeting the potatoes’ starch as the source of our troubles, we finally landed on a method of rinsing, parboiling, then frying. It was a bit of work, but the reward of fresh, golden homemade potato chips was well worth it. —America’s Test Kitchen

Find this recipe and 100+ more like it in our DIY Cookbook

Makes about 6 cups

Make today, enjoy immediately

1 pound medium Yukon Gold potatoes, sliced 1/16 inch thick on mandoline
2 quarts vegetable oil
Fine sea salt

1. Line rimmed baking sheet with clean dish towel. Set wire rack in second rimmed baking sheet and line with triple layer of paper towels; set both sheets aside. Place potato slices in large bowl and cover with cold water. Gently swirl potatoes to release starch. Drain potatoes and return to bowl. Repeat rinsing step until water no longer turns cloudy, about 5 rinses.

2. Bring 2 quarts water to boil in large saucepan over high heat. Add potatoes, return to gentle boil, and cook until just beginning to soften, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain potatoes well, then spread out over dish towel–lined sheet and thoroughly pat dry.

3. Meanwhile, heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat to 325 degrees. Carefully place one-quarter of potato slices in oil. Fry, stirring frequently with wire skimmer or slotted spoon, until oil stops bubbling and chips turn golden and crisp, 3 to 4 minutes. Adjust burner, if necessary, to maintain oil temperature around 325 degrees. As soon as chips finish frying (some chips may cook slightly faster than others), transfer to prepared wire rack using wire skimmer or slotted spoon. Season with salt to taste.

4. Return oil to 325 degrees and repeat with remaining potato slices in 3 more batches. Let cool completely before serving. (Kettle chips are best enjoyed the day they are made.)

Rise-and-Shine Day 4, Wondering why diners seem to be the only spot for perfectly crispy and buttery home fries? We thought it might have something to do with the professional-grade griddle, but instead, we found that the real secret for replicating diner-worthy spuds at home is all in the pre-cook prep. We sped things up (without boiling water) with the help of our time-saving microwave. Voilà! Potatoes worth worth waking up for. Short-Order Home Fries. Find 200+ Recipes Like This in The Complete Cook’s Country TV Show Cookbook:http://amzn.to/RWy8sH
Rise-and-Shine Day 4, Wondering why diners seem to be the only spot for perfectly crispy and buttery home fries? We thought it might have something to do with the professional-grade griddle, but instead, we found that the real secret for replicating diner-worthy spuds at home is all in the pre-cook prep. We sped things up (without boiling water) with the help of our time-saving microwave. Voilà! Potatoes worth worth waking up for. Short-Order Home Fries. Find 200+ Recipes Like This in The Complete Cook’s Country TV Show Cookbook:http://amzn.to/RWy8sH

Rise-and-Shine Day 4, Wondering why diners seem to be the only spot for perfectly crispy and buttery home fries? We thought it might have something to do with the professional-grade griddle, but instead, we found that the real secret for replicating diner-worthy spuds at home is all in the pre-cook prep. We sped things up (without boiling water) with the help of our time-saving microwave. Voilà! Potatoes worth worth waking up for. 

Short-Order Home Fries. 

Find 200+ Recipes Like This in The Complete Cook’s Country TV Show Cookbook:http://amzn.to/RWy8sH

Fried Chicken might be one of our favorite foods, but we knew there had to be a way to cut calories and still produce the golden-brown, crunchy, rich flavor.
Meet: Oven-Fried Chicken. 
Fried Chicken might be one of our favorite foods, but we knew there had to be a way to cut calories and still produce the golden-brown, crunchy, rich flavor.
Meet: Oven-Fried Chicken. 

Fried Chicken might be one of our favorite foods, but we knew there had to be a way to cut calories and still produce the golden-brown, crunchy, rich flavor.

Meet: Oven-Fried Chicken. 

We prove “extra-crisp” and “baked” aren’t mutually exclusive when it comes to fried chicken.
We prove “extra-crisp” and “baked” aren’t mutually exclusive when it comes to fried chicken.

We prove “extra-crisp” and “baked” aren’t mutually exclusive when it comes to fried chicken.