We make the mistakes in the kitchen, so that you don't have to.

You’ll Never Believe How We Make Perfect Bacon

In the test kitchen, we appreciate the beauty of bacon with a crispy and tender bite, rather than its being burned to a crisp. What innovative method ensures this perfect texture? We cook the bacon in water in a skillet.

Why? The addition of water keeps the initial cooking temperature low and gentle, so the meat retains its moisture and stays tender. By the time the water reaches its boiling point (212 degrees), the bacon fat is almost completely rendered, so you’re also much less likely to burn the meat while waiting for the fat to cook off.

Place the bacon (in strips or cut into pieces) and just enough water to cover it in a skillet over high heat. When the water reaches a boil, lower the heat to medium. Once all of the water has simmered away, turn down the heat to medium-low and continue cooking until the bacon is crisp and well browned. This way, the meat plumps up as it cooks instead of shriveling, leaving the bacon pleasantly crisp, not tough or brittle.

RELATED: 14 Reasons We Can’t Live Without Bacon

Super-porky, thinly sliced, or subtly smoked—all your favorites are here.From Bacon to Baloney: Get to Know Your Cured Meats: http://bit.ly/1bYkfCI
Super-porky, thinly sliced, or subtly smoked—all your favorites are here.From Bacon to Baloney: Get to Know Your Cured Meats: http://bit.ly/1bYkfCI

Super-porky, thinly sliced, or subtly smoked—all your favorites are here.

From Bacon to Baloney: Get to Know Your Cured Meats: http://bit.ly/1bYkfCI

We love thinking outside the box when it comes to finding the perfect solution for an odd job in the kitchen. Today, we’re teaching your old tools 3 brand-new tricks. http://bit.ly/17nUagg
We love thinking outside the box when it comes to finding the perfect solution for an odd job in the kitchen. Today, we’re teaching your old tools 3 brand-new tricks. http://bit.ly/17nUagg

We love thinking outside the box when it comes to finding the perfect solution for an odd job in the kitchen. Today, we’re teaching your old tools 3 brand-new tricks. http://bit.ly/17nUagg

A longtime fan battles the belly of the beast. Reader Spotlight: Timothy Donley Makes DIY Bacon. 
 
A longtime fan battles the belly of the beast. Reader Spotlight: Timothy Donley Makes DIY Bacon. 
 

A longtime fan battles the belly of the beast. Reader Spotlight: Timothy Donley Makes DIY Bacon

 

Attending a holiday party this weekend? Don’t forget to bring a batch of our sweet, savory and spreadable Bacon Jam.
Attending a holiday party this weekend? Don’t forget to bring a batch of our sweet, savory and spreadable Bacon Jam.

Attending a holiday party this weekend? Don’t forget to bring a batch of our sweet, savory and spreadable Bacon Jam.

It can be difficult to use up a pound of bacon before it becomes rancid. Freezing is the best way to preserve it, but if frozen in the original package, it’s impossible to later remove just a few slices at a time. To solve the dilemma, roll up the bacon in tight cylinders, each with two to four slices of bacon. Place the cylinders in a zipper-lock bag and place the bag flat in the freezer. (Once the slices are frozen, the bag can be stored as you like.) When bacon is needed, simply pull out the desired number of slices and defrost.
For more tips on bacon, click here.
It can be difficult to use up a pound of bacon before it becomes rancid. Freezing is the best way to preserve it, but if frozen in the original package, it’s impossible to later remove just a few slices at a time. To solve the dilemma, roll up the bacon in tight cylinders, each with two to four slices of bacon. Place the cylinders in a zipper-lock bag and place the bag flat in the freezer. (Once the slices are frozen, the bag can be stored as you like.) When bacon is needed, simply pull out the desired number of slices and defrost.
For more tips on bacon, click here.

It can be difficult to use up a pound of bacon before it becomes rancid. Freezing is the best way to preserve it, but if frozen in the original package, it’s impossible to later remove just a few slices at a time. To solve the dilemma, roll up the bacon in tight cylinders, each with two to four slices of bacon. Place the cylinders in a zipper-lock bag and place the bag flat in the freezer. (Once the slices are frozen, the bag can be stored as you like.) When bacon is needed, simply pull out the desired number of slices and defrost.

For more tips on bacon, click here.